New Dogs, New Tricks

23 Apr

McKessen Corporation’s Matthew Zubiller, ConAgra’s Kori Reed, and Whirlpool’s Pam Rogers Klyn have one thing in common, they are all young executives who maneuvered their ways onto the fast track for senior management at their respective companies. The source of their success? Unique approaches and innovative ideas. According to Wall Street Journal columnist Joann S. Lublin, “They overcame multiple challenges. They secured funding, won support from the skeptical top brass and practiced diplomatic persistence” (Lublin, WSJ).

The following principles helped them move up the corporate ladder:

  1. Be innovative.  Companies are starting to realize the importance of creativity and innovation. Young employees are encouraged to come up with new ideas in order to top competing firms.  CEO’s are looking for employees who are able to produce innovative and feasible ideas. Pam Rogers Klyn realized that in order to minimize production costs; Whirlpool should focus less on the manufacturing process and more on the employee’s work.
  2. Believe in your idea. When proposing an idea to your boss or co-workers it is extremely important to show your confidence in the idea. Kori Reed’s convinced the CEO that her work for ending children hunger had the ability to make a social impact and positively influence the company’s corporate image.
  3. Align ideas with the core of the company. Matthew Zubiller says that the most important way to get your idea heard is creating it with respect to what the company is already working on. If your ideas are far fetched from the company’s current work it will be more difficult to implement.

If you are confident and innovative you can make an impact on your company’s work.  We must believe in our ideas and know that all ideas have potential. Young people have the ability to take over the corporate world.

by Hallie Greitzer

Source: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204555904577169174294262182.html

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